Meaning: “Sea fortress”
Gender: Male
Pronunciation: MUR-lyn
Origin: English
Other forms of the name: Myrddin, Merlyn, Merlinus

Sorry I haven’t been posting lately, I was having way too much fun sleeping last weekend, and I’m working on a story right now that takes up most of my thinking space (which isn’t much!). Today I am profiling the name Merlin; I know, I know, you may be thinking “Merlin? Really? Are you nuts?” But I personally think Merlin would be an adorable name. Would it get a lot of looks? You bet your bottom dollar! But it is the perfect name for any adventurous namer.

Merlin is probably the most famous wizard out there (If you’re not counting Harry Potter that is) and everybody knows that he is friend and counselor to King Arthur from the Arthurian legends. But let’s dive a little further into the myth.

The standard character of Merlin was first featured in Geoffrey of Monmouth’s “Historia Regum Britanniae” which was written in 1136. Geoffrey based the character of Merlin off of Myrddin Wyllt who was a madman and Brythonic prophet along with Romano-British war leader Ambrosius Aurelianus. Thus, he created Merlin Ambrosius or Myrddin Emrys. Merlin, you may have guessed it, comes from the Welsh Myrddin which meant “sea fortress”. In the Latin form of the stories he used the name Merlinus. Probably because Merdinus is way too close to the French word for “faeces”.

Merlin was born of the mortal woman, Adhan, and an incubus which is where he got his powers from. In Geoffrey’s works he is only there for Arthur for a little while when he is younger before disappearing from the story all together. Merlin helped Arthur’s father, Uther Pendragon, enter Tintagel in order to lay with his enemy’s wife, Igraine, and father Arthur with her. The legend of Merlin is still extremely popular, being propelled into the limelight further by BBC’s “Merlin” which comes on Syfy and tells about the friendship of Merlin and King Arthur. Although the shows differs from the legend in many ways, it is still an enjoyable show.

Advertisements